Categories
Medical School Running

Olympic Years and Boards Fears

You guys. It’s an Olympic year. Rio 2016. I don’t know how many of you know this, but I friggin’ love the Olympics. I’m not really that patriotic any other time, there’s just something about the USA’s best of the best going to compete against the world. And- even better everyone gets to see the runners that I love perform on the world’s stage.
It always surprises me that the best of the best of America’s runners train together. You would think they would hide in their respective corners of the country and conceal their earth-shattering workout times and world class coaches and not let anyone know their secrets. In reality, its quite the opposite. They gather in Flagstaff like Amy Cragg and Shalane Flanagan, or Portland, or Boulder and take training trips up to altitude together. They run their tune up races stride for stride with each other. Its a pretty great example of how no one truly succeeds on their own. They push each other, help each other come back from injuries and pregnancies–yeesh!- faster than anyone would think possible.
Once they make it to the World Champs and Olympics these runners face the reality that they are now competing against their best friends, sometimes roommates, and running partners for the gold metal. But, they all know they never would have qualified without their teammate pushing them there.
My class is freaked out about boards. So freaked out, in fact, that our school cancelled a previously mandatory class this semester to make room for a mandatory board review class. Today, during that class, one of our professors told us how the last class that got a 100% board pass rate managed to pull it off. It was simple. They decided they weren’t going to let anyone fall back. They saw to it that everyone was going to do their practice questions, put in the work. We are eventually going to be competing against each other for residencies- but this is not the time for that. We all have to pass first. Its like making the US Olympic team together before you line up at the start and see which runner has what it takes to take it all the way to gold that day.
We are all starting from different places. Some of us are seasoned marathoners just following our routine that’s always given faithful results.  Some of us are transitioning from really great 10k performances to the almighty marathon- and hoping to be able to manage the mileage. Some of us cough-me-cough-cough are like Kara Goucher when she first went pro, who has been on the elliptical 4 hours a day for months doing no real high-impact work and instead of getting somewhere, got a stress fracture in her femur. Yes, that happens. The point is that we get everyone out there on the roads, putting in miles and hitting their splits.
I want to tell everyone that my class didn’t let anyone bow out of the race early. I want to tell everyone that even though some of my teammates are better than me, that we all helped each other get on Team USA. Those that fell or got injured, were lightly nurtured back onto their feet and shown that they have what it takes to still finish strong.
I’ve found my resolve. Let’s do everything we can to get there.
The Olympic Trials Marathon is February 13th. It determines who’s going to Rio. Our boards are scheduled throughout May and June. That is our qualifying race.
Class of 2018- Let’s take these boards to Rio!
 
 

womenstart1usolyt2012 Source

Categories
Medical School Medicine

Second Semester Classes

I’m a little over 2 months deep in my second semester of medical school. I have finished my cardiovascular block, and am now a week into neurology/neuroanatomy. Its a doozy, but it’s nothing compared to last semester.
I got an email to talk about the classes I have, and I wanted to do it before Neuro gets too crazy, so here it is!
The second semester of medical school:
My school is in its second year of switching to systems-based learning and we officially start the systems in our second semester with cardiovascular. That basically means we go through every system in the body and cover everything that entails in about 6 weeks per system. We learn physiology, normal function, and review some anatomy, then we dive right into everything that can go wrong with it, what the symptoms are, the diagnostic tests you run, how to diagnose, and then finally the drugs to treat it.
The only thing is that there are so many different things going on now that I get a little overwhelmed. In addition to our systems block (which is the heaviest part of our lecture hours each week), we have Clinical Problem Solving, Clinical Skills Class and Lab, OMM Class and Lab, Developing the Physician, and now a Neuroanatomy Lab each week.
Clinical Problem Solving gives us a clinical case each week and is incorporated strongly into our systems courses. We learn to write SOAP notes and discuss diagnosis and treatment in small groups with a practicing physician. Easily my favorite time in class each week!
Clinical Skills teaches us how to perform physical exams, take histories, systems checks, auscultation, and other “real doctor” things. The lab that goes along with it also puts us with a practicing doc in the Tulsa area and we practice our skills on each other. Standardized patients (paid actors) come occasionally and we practice on them as well.
In OMM we have a lecture and lab each week. We practice our techniques on each other. We have officially finished muscle energy techniques and are moving into counterstrain.
Developing the Physician is a class where we are exposed to various issues in medicine. They are especially focusing us in on Geriatrics this semester and handling all the special controversies and humanity issues that that entails. A few weeks ago they gave us goggles that simulated going blind. Take that as you will. Nothing in the class is particularly hard, but there are due dates for papers, shadowing to do and small groups that always seem to be inconveniently timed with everything else going on.
All of these classes have their own exams too, which also don’t always line up well with the systems courses. For example, we are responsible for the dermatologic exam in Clinical Skills when we haven’t learned anything about the skin! Two tests in one week doesn’t happen a lot, but it always freaks me out a little bit because every little facet in medicine has SO MUCH material.
Neuro is just a little ridiculous. We have some really good professors this block but nothing is more complex than the dang spinal cord to me. How anything gets transmitted correctly in the body is beyond me. Still, being out of basic sciences, and learning the real medicine is such a wonderful milestone to have finally made it to. After all, its been a long road with science after science. Finding out that medicine is everything I wanted it to be is extremely satisfying.
There’s a little glimpse into my classes and how I’m learning.
Those of you who are in medical school, how does your school do it? Comment or message me!
Thanks for reading!

Categories
Life Medical School Running

How A Random Run Reminded Me How to Med School

Its been a pretty hellish week. Last week, I think I was operating on the fumes of a month long exhaustion situation and just got flat out sick. I was nauseous, my back hurt, I had a headache, I couldn’t eat, I had no energy and no amount of coffee was helping. I was falling asleep anytime I sat still. I went home early one evening for a dentist appointment. And oh goodie, I have TMJ! Guess what causes it? STRESS! I told my dentist my situation with medical school and all got the “bless your heart” look. He knows what it’s like.
Anyway, I had a huge Friday test in Histo and then another one on Monday in Anatomy that I didn’t do well on at all. I could blame it on many things: Not feeling good, having too much material, the awful Friday/Monday test situation, etc. But, I’ll take the blame for it and just say that I was not ready for that test. Still, I know myself well enough to know that I won’t get them all. So I took the good with the bad. I did pretty well on Biomed, I just didn’t get the anatomy one this time.
I stepped outside on one of the first truly chilly nights we’ve had this October. Some generic Pandora hiphop station starts up in my earbuds and I start to feel freedom in my very first steps off the porch. I didn’t bring a watch. Didn’t need one. This run isn’t for time. Its for clarity. By 16 seconds in- I guarantee you- its not school on my mind anymore. Sometimes its nothing on my mind at all. 7 minutes in and I might as well be flying. The wind is just cold enough to bite at my throat and ears a little, but I don’t care. Chilly fall weather that you can still wear shorts in- is prime running time. Especially at night when the street lights make the wet roads look like black glass reflecting it to twice the city lights.  I blow through cross walks and stretches of street without sidewalk. Up and down curbs, around bends, and mud holes. I cross the street but am sure to run straight down the double yellow line in the middle of the road a few steps because its where I feel the most free; like nothing can stop me- not even city ordinances and 2-ton hunks of metal.
In running, it’s never mattered to me whether I’m puttering and sputtering and choking and hurting just to keep putting one foot in front of the other, or if I’m in cruise mode, just chilling at a smooth pace, enjoying the view. I could even be gutting it out, leaving it all on the line grimacing with the speed of my own legs’ muscle memory out running my own lungs. None of that matters. I’ve always just been chasing that feeling. Maybe its runner’s high. I don’t know. At a certain point, though, the body takes over- if my mind will let it.
Its a place where my leg turnover carries me further than I thought I could go after not running for 9 days 16 hours and 21 minutes. Like pedaling a bike upside down. If you crank the pedals a few times,  the wheels won’t quit spinning for quite some time. Its just residual motion and it doesn’t require any thought whatsoever. It’ll just stop whenever it stops. That’s what my legs feel like.
Or that feeling I get when I give a little extra power in my hamstring to leap an extra-long stride’s length off a curb and head downhill, busting out the bass drum tempo to my song with my feet. It’s a feeling I would imagine getting when you go up a ramp and land on the other side of ten buses all in a row and land safely on the other side.
It’s a feeling when I don’t feel like my legs or lungs want me to keep going because they’re hurting, but I keep going somehow as if the act of running were involuntary. Like it comes naturally.
Its going so fast I feel my heart up in my throat. I know I can’t hold the pace for long, its just nice to amp up and feel my body working with me not against me for once. Its slowing down and feeling the tension come out, the adrenaline ebbs and flows and I get comfortable again.
It’s feeling comfortable on a run at all. Ever.
Who ever thought running would be my biggest comfort during medical school?
Running makes me powerful, joyous, competent, and aggressive, but yet, graceful. I feel loose and free and fierce and accomplished. I feel feminine and strong and not anything near weakness. I feel confident and beautiful and happy. I never feel like I don’t measure up, because its just me there and I am running and that is all I am doing. I feel like I’m doing something, because I am.
Every step is quantifiable, definite, appreciable, and proven. Every step proves something to myself- that I can go one more step. I look back at all the steps I’ve taken and can’t even trace the path I ran 8 minutes ago with my eyes. Do you know how few times that happens in life? Where you can work- and work hard- and then look at where you came from and where you are now and SEE- actually SEE- a quantifiable difference that can’t be argued with. Its an incredible feeling. When I study and study for 14 hours a day, I go home with nothing. I have no proof I can see. I have nothing to show for it. Only time and tests will tell whether that time was worth something- if I gained anything from that work.
On a run though, I come home with work I can see. The sweat on my face and shirt. The five miles of pavement I left behind me. Chewed up, spit out, burnt up asphalt that I conquered with my own two feet. Even the pain in my left foot tells me I’ve done work.
Running gives me things I don’t get to experience a whole lot anymore. It gives me a good dose of accomplishment, stands me back up, builds confidence, and makes me happy.
It’s the whole theme of steps that gets me and keeps me going in school. The runs carry me through in more ways than I can count. That even if its baby steps, slow steps, big steps, or steps where I flat out stumble and fall and get back up again, I’m still getting somewhere. I try not to forget that when I’m endlessly studying. Each powerpoint, lecture, sentence, note, drawing, and test is a step and I’m getting somewhere whether I see it or not. My steps aren’t always the best or fastest or more graceful, but they mean I’m working. And whatever else anyone around me is doing, I get a lot of satisfaction out of knowing I’m out on the road taking laborious, painful, glorious, work-for-every-last-one-of-them steps, and everyone is driving by fast in a car acting like they’re getting somewhere.

Categories
Life Medical School

Medical school paradox

Everything is so fast. Full speed ahead barreling down a never-ending hill of unimportant, yet necessary, mind-boggling yet mindless knowledge. Speedily tracking down who-knows-what going somewhere none of us knows anything about, at such a dizzying pace that I really have no idea if I’m so exhausted I’m invigorated or the other way around. I look at my watch at 3:46 PM wondering how it got that late without me learning anything. All I know is that I look at my watch at the end of the day and wonder if I did anything at all as the hours flew by and I’m another day behind. I feel like December could have already come and gone and I wouldn’t know.
Yet, it’s so freaking, painstakingly slow that I’m not sure if I’ve been here my whole life or if I’ve forgotten my life previous to this. The hours drag on so slow, you’d think I was listening to lectures on quantum theory while someone was literally picking me apart cell by cell. So slow I can’t keep my eyes open and I can’t fall asleep. I feel the seconds tick by like hours reminding me that as slow as it’s going, I still don’t possibly have enough time to get everything done. Every second slinking by as sleepily as me, groaning “Study, always study!” as they wither and die, breathing their last breath for an eternity. I sit in lecture wondering how it could possibly be only 8:23, knowing I have at least 40x the amount I’ve been sitting here before I get to go home and study more. Oh, when will it be December?

Categories
Life Lists Medical School

10 Things Vol. 2

1. Test tomorrow. So yeah, I should be studying.
2. This week should be a little lighter in terms of Biomedical foundations material. Its a short week and anatomy is starting, so we only have 5 BMF lectures.
3. ANATOMY IS STARTING. I loved anatomy in undergrad so I hope my love stays strong and doesn’t turn to resentment. Humans are so neat, guys.
4. I get to have lunch with my senior (as in old people) mentor. This will be our first time meeting them. We will have a couple of assignments with them throughout this semester. We get to take a personal history and a medical history. I hope mine is precious and not gross.
5. Running is going great. I didn’t expect to rely on it as much I do. Mostly because when I was in undergrad, running sort of fell by the wayside. Now, after a solid two months of 5-7 days a week, I can feel at the end of the day when I’m all amped and ready to run. The rule is, if I have time to think about getting a run in, I run.
6. My study buddy has been gone for labor day weekend and I really feel the struggle without her. Not being able to talk things out has me tweaking so I don’t think this test will be as good as the first two.
7. There’s a lot of life in medical school. If any of my posts have deterred you from pursuing a future in medicine, that’s not what I’m trying to do here. Its fun and ultimately its going to be great and worth it, if its what you want to do.
8. I think what has helped me the most with anxiety (test anxiety and otherwise) is the amount of “busy” I’m taking on. I didn’t know what busy was. Like I said, I’m either studying, or about to study. I don’t have time to think about what I’m not doing because I’m always doing something or making progress towards being able to do something.
9. I drink a lot of water. At least two liters a day. I feel better when I do. Plus, filling up my water bottle and peeing in between lectures and as mini study breaks keep me from getting too comfortable and falling asleep.
10. Study, study, school’s your buddy!

Categories
Medical School

Late nights

Marathon studying has begun. In part because of some highly disorganized teaching and partly because it’s just gonna happen when you cover glycolysis, through the rest of biochemistry in a week.
Last night, I got home late from school and thought it would be a great time-saver to take my toothbrush into the shower and brush my teeth. I’m not sure if it saves time or not but I do it quite a bit. Anyway I’m not sure if it was the break in routine or if I was really that “out of it,” but I swallowed the entire mouthful of toothpaste.
What. In. The. World.
Needless to say, I’m glad it’s Friday.

Categories
Medical School

My Medical School Study Plan

I’m about done with the class that started before medical school! Yay! Right in time for Friday, which begins this crazy journey called medical school. So I wanted to share some of the things that I learned. The expert skills program originally came from Texas Tech but my school is doing a version of it that will cover all four semesters (MS-1 and 2). This segment, called block one, is supposed to begin the summer before medical school. It covers things like your learning style, how to do concept maps, how to study effectively and efficiently, and coping with stress.
Now that I’m almost done, it has been a really good thing for me I think. Though some of the principles can be used for any kind of study, its geared specifically for the high volume of material of medical school. I think from undergraduate, I know how to study well, but my methods were time-consuming and I still bombed some tests- oops. I didn’t always feel glad to be doing it when I found out they were taking some of my summer away. Still, the prof has been really flexible on everyone’s due dates because he knows its summer.
This method is something I feel like I can manage. I won’t follow it exactly though, because I still like some of my old tried and true things I do like reading aloud.
The most interesting part for me has been learning my “type”. They have a test based on the Meyer-Briggs personality test, but theirs only tells you your learning type. Mine is ISFJ. Which is Introvert, Sensing, Feeling, Judging. Your overall personality type can be much different than you learning type, and as with most things related to psychological testing, real people are much more complicated so I very well could have extrovert  leaning 49% of the time and introvert 51% of the time and it would still call me an introvert.
Anyways, this is my type description in a nutshell
Sympathetic, manager of facts and details, stable conservative, concerned with people’s welfare, dependable painstaking (haha! I love that word), systematic, uses sensible intelligence, loves practical skills, learns best by myself, I enjoy learning things best when they have proven value, I prefer steady, sequential work (yes!), I have a controlled and orderly life, have a patient, persistent attention to other’s needs, I follow a sensible path based on my experiences, I have a rich memory of concrete facts (absolutely true), I value a few strong relationships, I like consistency, the familiar, and the tried and true, I value compassion, kindness, and caring,  I prefer to work according to a plan and schedule,  I like authority (I beg to differ)  and set procedures. I value hard work and perseverance most in myself.
I think its overall pretty accurate!
What struck me most was how accurate it was when it was talking about how I handle stress! Oh man. It was bad I was all like mmHmm.
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“You tend not to trust your ability to use your imagination and to see new alternatives for a stressful situation. Instead, you will tend to assume that your way is the only right way to manage a situation. This leads to uncontrolled intuitive type behavior under stress, such as an unrealistic doom and gloom outlook, which can cause you to give up on seeking alternative solutions to the situation. Let’s keep using the example where you are exhausted from long hours of study and then you learn that you have scored a 50 on an exam that you thought you had mastered. An exaggerated intuitive response would cause your imagination to go spinning out of control, causing you to treat the situation out of proportion as a catastrophic event. Your normally practical behavior would give way to impulsive, rash behavior such as abruptly taking off in the middle of the day to go to a movie or to go buy a new stereo system (which you can’t afford). ”
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Anyway, here’s the study plan they outline.

“SuccessTypes time management
Identification stage. Identify material you don’t already know the night before lecture. Highlight terms and concepts you don’t know, or write them down. Spend 5-10 minutes or less per lecture hour.
Orientation stage. Use the lecture to give you an orientation to the terms and concepts that need to be learned. Check off the concepts you highlighted or listed during the identification stage.
Organization stage. Develop a visual organization of the material as soon as possible (at least on the same day). Spend most of your available time doing this.
Verification stage. Dedicate blocks of time on the weekend to each course. Use verbal paraphrasing to review your notes and to determine what topics need more study. When your verification process shows that you have a specific area of difficulty, refer to the text or notes, or arrange to see the instructor. ”
 
So basically before I go to bed each night, I’ll look at the pages going to be covered in lecture. Highlight the “words” I don’t know- (Not entire paragraphs! I used to do that). During lecture I will then have something to listen for and will take paraphrased notes over what is emphasized or repeated while checking off the terms the professor actually covers. These terms will be important to study later. Then I can concept map or draw out the material covered each school day that same evening. End each night by highlighting the material for tomorrow. Saturdays and Sundays will be spent doing the verification step where I reconstruct the material from my visuals only. Review everything covered that week. Start over again on the identification step Sunday night for the lecture Monday. Whew. Sounds like a lot of work, but I think it sounds manageable.
We’ll see if it sticks. Idunno.
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-All excerpts and paraphrase  from “SuccessTypes in Medical Education” by Dr. Pelley and Dr. Dalley.
In the book they suggested we pay it forward and teach someone else what we’ve learned. So there ya go!
 
 
 
Categories
Life Medical School Medicine Science

The-Burnout,-Doubt-Everything,-Find-Resolve-Again Cycle

Pre-meds take heart.
I ache for you. I really do.
I know how it is. I know you doubt your decision to become a doctor or PA constantly. I know that it comes at the worst times too. Right before a test.
I used to sit in the student union with my science classmates, staring at our textbooks. We watched the sun go down from the same spot almost every night. We ordered dinner in there; sipped coffee; ate entirely too many sour straws. We pretended to know how to explain the problems’ solutions to each other. We tried index cards, quizzing each other, making up games, and repeating the answers over and over. We tried writing it out multiple times and diagramming it, any creative way to make it easier on ourselves to learn.
During this ritual, one or all of us would end up with eyes glazed over, elbow resting on the book, face in hand. Or worse-  head down resting on the book staring off into the void.
Jenna would catch my eye and say “What?” as in “What are you thinking?” and I’d spout off our usual joke about wishing the information would just enter my brain through osmosis as I was laying on it.
Then- and stay with me here because our overloaded minds rarely make  sense. “I just…. I can’t… I mean… [sigh]. This is just really hard and I hate it and I’m tired and I can’t… I mean…. ugh… WHY?
Natural progression dictates the others around you join in on the moaning. Such begins a big discussion of every cruel assignment, poorly written test, where your grades are at, how bad/good your week is on workload, and a psychoanalysis of how to conquer every class and professor. It goes on and on.
Eventually I would realize that all the other study groups in the room are long gone. The moon is so high its not visible from the wall of windows anymore. Everything is closed. My roommate is probably fast asleep at home. I start gathering up my stuff realizing I’m not studying anymore tonight and sleep would better serve me. As soon as the backpack is slung around to my back, books out of sight, I feel immediately guilty that I have not studied enough.
I walk to my car slumped over, exhausted and sometimes genuinely depressed at another day of failure. Of not understanding. Of not making the grade. Of wanting to do something, anything other than how I spent my hours that day.
I get to my apartment, briefly stare into the kitchen and decide that making food would take too much energy even though I had apple rings and red diamond tea for dinner 8 hours ago. I get ready for bed literally beside my bed, the motions so familiar I don’t even turn the light on. Its simple really.
Take backpack off, set it on the floor beside my bed where I grab it first thing the next morning. Pull my bra out of my shirt, take my pants off. Plug in my phone. Get in bed. No makeup removal, no brushing teeth.
This, my friends, is the burn out.
I feel for you premeds because I know this trudgery well. It was my life for what felt like most nights of the last three years. I know how you feel even if you can’t say it.
What we are not able to articulate to our study buddies in the moment where you are pondering your life silently instead of actively studying- is how you aren’t sure if you want to actually do this. To be a doctor. You don’t know if you can do it all through undergrad and then add four more years. You don’t even know if you’ll pass physics and it keeps you up at night when you are so so tired. At the ripe age of 20, you are burnt out and you want to do something else. Please, God, anything else!! You just don’t have it in you anymore.
Believe me there are plenty of people that will tell you that you can go ahead and do something else. Many of your classmates will choose something else and you will secretly envy them. I did. They are probably the wise ones. The ones that will be able to go on a trip to Cabo with 3 other married couples when they’re 25 while you are still in school. Its a respectable and understandable choice. I wish I had been able to do something else.
Several times, though, in the middle of the “doubt everything” phase, I would consider my other options. “What else would I do?” I thought. “What do I really want to be doing?”
I didn’t have a single answer. In the moment there were plenty of things I would rather do: eat, stand outside, take a shower, make a phone call, break down and cry, stab a professor, eat again, sleep. But in the future? What did I want to be? A doctor. That was always the answer. I want to see patients. I want them to trust me, let me into their lives, mourn with them, appreciate their humanity, heal them, understand their health as a human being better than any other doctor they’ve ever had.
My rational mind then takes me to what I must do as a follow up. If being a doctor is all I want, and being a doctor requires medical school and medical school requires I pass this course. Then it follows that passing this course requires I study. So here I sit and here I will study. This is what you want to do. That’s all the resolve I need. It’s that simple.
In each burn out, you ultimately have to figure it out for yourself if medicine is still want you want to do, time after time. But I just want you to know that it happens, and it happens to everyone. Often. Questioning it isn’t a reason to quit. It not being what you want is a reason to quit. Because being a doctor is going to take a lot of work. Its probably going to take a lot out of you. You can do it, though, if its what you want to do. It’s going to be easier to handle all the work, when you realize that its not just something you have to do, in the end, you wouldn’t rather be doing anything else.
Also, go easy on yourself. It may be miserable to sit there studying; I know my group dreaded going in to study at the end of class each day, but being there is half the battle. And if you really wanted to be doing something else, you’d be out there doing it, not studying.
I know it sounds crazy but I actually miss those late nights with friends studying and talking and whining about our lives. I’m scared out of my pants for medical school to start! What if its worse than those terrible nights?! Now that is scary.
“It’s so strange how life works: you want something and you wait and wait [and work] and feel like its taking forever to come. Then it happens and it’s over and all you want to do is curl back up in that moment before things changed.” -Lauren Oliver
 

Categories
Life Science

How I know I'll make it

Yesterday I was faced with every senior’s dream come true…
A pass/fail (hard) class with a final I can get a zero on and still pass. I can literally walk away. Unscathed. Scot free.
I rejoiced. I bragged to several people. I mentally told myself that I do not have to study at all for that final, giving me a completely free evening. I breathed a sigh of relief, knowing that I had perhaps already taken my last Malmberg test.
I considered not even going to take the final. I entertained the idea of not studying. Both are opportunities I have only dreamt of having in my four years here. This does not happen in the OBU science department. Even if your grade is good enough, you dare not skip a final because you will undoubtedly have that same professor again next year and you do not want them to have a bad view of you. I’m telling you this so you realize how big of a deal this is.
So, here I was faced with this exact scenario.
Pretty quickly, I decided I would go take the final and just not study.
I sat idle for about 2 minutes. Then I picked up my book, got out my notes, and studied- hard- for about 6 hours.
I know. I was surprised as well.
I studied it while I ate snacks, I studied while I watched TV. Each time I got up to pee or get a drink, I picked it right back up without dreading an evening of studying. I did it because I wanted to.
Suddenly, when presented with the opportunity to either learn optional material or just sit and be ignorant, I decided to learn. Maybe I am frightened of being unprepared for a situation I have control over. Maybe I care more about what my professors think than I say I do. It could be many things. It is not, however, because I am an overachiever or a star student. I doubt I will even do that well on the exam.
It’s because whatever else I am or am not, I will not settle for less than the best of whatever I can do right now in the moment. I am a doer.
This is something my dad will tell me he knew was true all along.
But it’s revolutionary for me, going into medical school, afraid of already being burnt out on school. Now I know that however much I’m beaten down, however bad my confidence suffers, however much work I have to do, that I would still rather do the work than have nothing to do at all. I want to know all the things. And apparently I can’t rest until I know I’ve made progress in that endeavor.
Bring it on med school

Categories
House Life Products

Introduction to THE STUDY ROOM

I’m trying to think of a clever name for the study room that will become my office during medical school but nothing has hit me yet.
Here it is! The official before pictures. You’ll see it evolve more and more starting when I get back to Tulsa after graduation (10 days 21 hours and 39 minutes from now), but who’s counting?

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It looks a mess right now!

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Right now the room serves as a guest bedroom, game room, craft room, and storage closet.
First order of business will be to get rid of the junk (including the pac man machine) and condense the closet.
Next, we will restore, build, or buy furniture and put my desk in and make it functional as an office.
It will still serve as a guest bedroom when my girls come to visit! So the bed stays.
Lastly will be setting the mood and prettying it up to be an inspiring, productive space for use throughout medical school!
 
I have big plans for this room.
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I’m going with a soft color palate of teal and beige with pops of salmon. I’m looking for a lot of natural textiles like raw wood, burlap, sea glass and plant-y things. The bedspread, I want neutral and vintage. Lamps, lights, and chair can be sort of industrial. The art I want to be animal, plant or anatomy/medical inspired. I also want to incorporate a comfortable reading area with twinkle lights somehow.
I can’t wait to see how it turns out and update you guys on the process.
*A lot of these images (especially paint colors) I got from Young House Love. The sawhorse desk is something I made. I found the vintage medical posters on pinterest. Other places I looked grabbed pictures from include Ikea, Target, West Elm, and Etsy. If you need a specific source let me know! I’m not trying to copy someone else without crediting them.